Tag archive: macintosh

Snuglets – Making Magsafe 2 Not Drive Me Insane

When Apple first introduced the MagSafe power adapter connector it felt like a big step forward in an area no other company was making improvements in. MagSafe used magnetism to couple the power adapter connector to the notebook. Other manufacturers still used mechanical couplings, which were prone to crashing your notebook to the floor if you or your pet or your Roomba managed to get snagged in the power cord. With MagSafe the cord would easily detach from the computer. Otherwise it stayed firmly in place.

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Fixing Perl after MacOS X Security Update 2009-001

Apple’s first security update of 2009 for MacOS X may solve some security issues in the OS but it also seriously breaks Perl by installing old versions of some modules along with Perl. It looks like Perl works okay for things that MacOS X uses it for, but if you do development using it or have installed other modules than what it came bundled with you may find that it no longer works.

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Use sudo Without a Password on Your Mac

sudo is a command-line UNIX utility that allows you to execute a command as another user (most likely, the superuser). Usually you’ll use it to execute a single command:


sudo dmesg

or to start a shell:


sudo -s

sudo is similar to the su command – the su command also allows you to become another user (most likely root). The difference is that su requires you to type the other user’s password. sudo allows you to use your own password. The file /etc/sudoers tells the system who is allowed to do what using the sudo command. In a multiuser environment, this has the benefit of allowing multiple users to become root (or other users) without giving them the root password. Then you can easily revoke root privileges from a user if you need to without affecting the other people who may need to become root.

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Offline jQuery Documentation for MacOS X

I’m rewriting UVFood to use jQuery instead of Prototype. I’m liking jQuery quite a bit and my code’s looking much better (and tighter).

I don’t always have reliable online access when I’m coding – in particular, I was on a bus today for a couple of hours and didn’t always have Internet access. There are a couple of dashboard widgets for MacOS X which I found that helped out on the jQuery documentation front.

First, there’s http://code.google.com/p/jquery-reference/. This widget is designed for browsing… click around in it, but don’t expect to search it.

Then there’s also http://blog.medallia.com/2007/05/jquery_reference_widget.html. This widget is designed for searching – if you know what you’re looking for, you can find it quickly.

They’re both useful in different ways, and I used them both this afternoon.

MacOS X DVDs – Versions and Saving a Little Money on Them

A brief discussion on a private mailing list I’m on reminded me that there might be some interest in this.

MacOS X Leopard has been out for a while, but there are still a lot of folks who haven’t upgraded to it.

The upgrade comes in two versions, the single user licensed one and the “family pack”.

The single user licensed version is as it says, licensed for use on a single Apple computer and lists for $129.99. The family pack is licensed for use for up to five machines in one household, and lists for $199, a pretty good deal for staying legal at less than the cost of two single user licenses. While you can buy the single user and family packs directly from Apple with no shipping fees, Amazon usually has a better deal. At the time I wrote this, they were charging $26 less than list for the single user edition and $44.51 less than list for the family pack, both with free shipping.

If you’re coming to it from the Windows world, you’ll find that Mac OS X Leopard is a pleasure to install. It requires no serial numbers or product activation. You won’t have to worry about matching the particular distribution to the particular CD key.

You should be forewarned that, in my experience, the restore DVD that comes with a computer will only work with that computer or class of computers. So if you have a MacBook restore DVD it likely will refuse to install on an iMac.

Amazon also has a pretty good deal on Leopard Server: $104.51 off the 10 user version (normal list price $499) and $168.46 off the unlimited user version (normal list price $999). Leopard Server does have a serial number and will detect multiple copies of itself running on the same network.

I don’t expect the next version of MacOS X (“Snow Leopard”) to be out for another 9 to 15 months. Snow Leopard is targeted at providing performance and stability rather than feature enhancements, and will only run on Intel machines. It should be a worthwhile upgrade (who doesn’t want performance and stability?) but I wouldn’t hold my breath waiting for it.

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